Continence Resources

01 October 2020
Urinary incontinence (UI) is among the most common paediatric problems and it is commonly assumed to resolve with age. Consequently, parents and clinicians often adopt a ‘wait and see’ approach to childhood UI (Berry, 2006). A significant proportion of children, however, continue to suffer from persistent UI into adolescence (Swithinbank et al, 1998; Hellstrom et al, 1995; Yeung et al, 2006; Heron et al, 2017). For example, the authors’ research using data from a large birth cohort (Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children — www.bristol.ac.uk/alspac/) found that 4.2% of females and 1.3% of males experienced UI at the age of 14 years (Heron et al, 2017).
Topics:  young people
01 October 2020
Urinary incontinence is prevalent in men, with 61% of the general population of men experiencing lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) (NHS England, 2018). These symptoms present as problems with voiding, storage or post-micturition of urine (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence [NICE], 2017). Even after assessment and treatment, some men are still left with urinary incontinence, which is normally managed or contained by either pad products or urinary catheters (if clinically indicated). However, there is a vast range of alternative devices for containment. This article reviews some of the alternative devices that are available, namely sheaths, body worn urinals and penile compression clamps. It discusses the merits and disadvantages of each device and advises when they should or should not be used.
11 August 2020

Rectal interventions are a fundamental part of nursing care across all settings aimed at establishing whether effective bowel emptying is taking place. Functional bowel disorders, including constipation, are common conditions affecting many of the general population and often go undetected by both patients, who perceive it as their normal, and healthcare professionals, who may not include a thorough bowel assessment at every clinical contact due to time restraints, lack of knowledge, or fear of intimate procedures causing harm or embarrassment. An inaccurate or complete lack of appropriate bowel assessment can increase risk of harm or ill health for many patients and therefore should be an intrinsic part of everyday clinical contact. The Royal College of Nursing (RCN) recently reviewed its bowel care guidance (Fenton et al, 2019) to address some of the concerns around bowel assessment and management. With an ever changing workforce, multiple grades of registered and non-registered staff taking on additional tasks, it is prudent for all clinicians to review their current knowledge and practice to ensure that they are following the latest evidence-based guidance for safe and effective practice.

Topics:  Continence
11 August 2020

Rectal interventions are a fundamental part of nursing care across all settings aimed at establishing whether effective bowel emptying is taking place. Functional bowel disorders, including constipation, are common conditions affecting many of the general population and often go undetected by both patients, who perceive it as their normal, and healthcare professionals, who may not include a thorough bowel assessment at every clinical contact due to time restraints, lack of knowledge, or fear of intimate procedures causing harm or embarrassment. An inaccurate or complete lack of appropriate bowel assessment can increase risk of harm or ill health for many patients and therefore should be an intrinsic part of everyday clinical contact. The Royal College of Nursing (RCN) recently reviewed its bowel care guidance (Fenton et al, 2019) to address some of the concerns around bowel assessment and management. With an ever changing workforce, multiple grades of registered and non-registered staff taking on additional tasks, it is prudent for all clinicians to review their current knowledge and practice to ensure that they are following the latest evidence-based guidance for safe and effective practice.

Topics:  Knowledge
11 August 2020

Rectal interventions are a fundamental part of nursing care across all settings aimed at establishing whether effective bowel emptying is taking place. Functional bowel disorders, including constipation, are common conditions affecting many of the general population and often go undetected by both patients, who perceive it as their normal, and healthcare professionals, who may not include a thorough bowel assessment at every clinical contact due to time restraints, lack of knowledge, or fear of intimate procedures causing harm or embarrassment. An inaccurate or complete lack of appropriate bowel assessment can increase risk of harm or ill health for many patients and therefore should be an intrinsic part of everyday clinical contact. The Royal College of Nursing (RCN) recently reviewed its bowel care guidance (Fenton et al, 2019) to address some of the concerns around bowel assessment and management. With an ever changing workforce, multiple grades of registered and non-registered staff taking on additional tasks, it is prudent for all clinicians to review their current knowledge and practice to ensure that they are following the latest evidence-based guidance for safe and effective practice.

Topics:  Knowledge
10 August 2020

Current Covid restrictions have forced many healthcare professionals to embrace technology and work in very different ways. Indeed, the traditional telephone has allowed the Newcastle continence service to provide a service to patients referred with all types of urinary incontinence. But, is it even possible to assess someone’s continence and devise a treatment plan over the telephone?

Topics:  Continence
10 August 2020

It is estimated that one in 12 children and young people in the UK suffer with a wetting or soiling problem, which can have a devastating impact on their family life, social life and self-esteem (NHS Modernisation Agency, 2003). Afraid of wetting themselves in class or on a school trip; too many children and teenagers are missing out on sleepovers and camping trips, being bullied and constantly trying to hide the signs of their ‘secret’.

Topics:  Continence
10 August 2020

Current Covid restrictions have forced many healthcare professionals to embrace technology and work in very different ways. Indeed, the traditional telephone has allowed the Newcastle continence service to provide a service to patients referred with all types of urinary incontinence. But, is it even possible to assess someone’s continence and devise a treatment plan over the telephone?

Topics:  Continence
10 August 2020

It is estimated that one in 12 children and young people in the UK suffer with a wetting or soiling problem, which can have a devastating impact on their family life, social life and self-esteem (NHS Modernisation Agency, 2003). Afraid of wetting themselves in class or on a school trip; too many children and teenagers are missing out on sleepovers and camping trips, being bullied and constantly trying to hide the signs of their ‘secret’.

Topics:  Continence
10 August 2020

Current Covid restrictions have forced many healthcare professionals to embrace technology and work in very different ways. Indeed, the traditional telephone has allowed the Newcastle continence service to provide a service to patients referred with all types of urinary incontinence. But, is it even possible to assess someone’s continence and devise a treatment plan over the telephone?

Topics:  Continence