Nutrition Resources

10 August 2020

Food fatigue is a psychological condition which results in lack of motivation or enthusiasm to consume food. Left untreated, this can lead to malnutrition, lack of energy and dehydration. In a bid to alleviate food fatigue for customers, including those individuals who may have been clinically shielded or especially vulnerable through the Covid-19 pandemic, home meals delivery company, Wiltshire Farm Foods, has collaborated with leading chefs in the South West and launched a new and inspirational summer kitchen range giving added variety, freshness and choice.

Topics:  Nutrition
10 August 2020

Food fatigue is a psychological condition which results in lack of motivation or enthusiasm to consume food. Left untreated, this can lead to malnutrition, lack of energy and dehydration. In a bid to alleviate food fatigue for customers, including those individuals who may have been clinically shielded or especially vulnerable through the Covid-19 pandemic, home meals delivery company, Wiltshire Farm Foods, has collaborated with leading chefs in the South West and launched a new and inspirational summer kitchen range giving added variety, freshness and choice.

Topics:  Nutrition
10 August 2020

Food fatigue is a psychological condition which results in lack of motivation or enthusiasm to consume food. Left untreated, this can lead to malnutrition, lack of energy and dehydration. In a bid to alleviate food fatigue for customers, including those individuals who may have been clinically shielded or especially vulnerable through the Covid-19 pandemic, home meals delivery company, Wiltshire Farm Foods, has collaborated with leading chefs in the South West and launched a new and inspirational summer kitchen range giving added variety, freshness and choice.

Topics:  Nutrition
05 June 2020

The Managing Adult Malnutrition in the Community team has worked with the British Dietetic Association (BDA) and the British Association for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (BAPEN) to develop a range of patient information leaflets to advise those who have Covid-19 illness, or who are recovering after the illness, on eating well to assist in their recovery.

Topics:  Nutrition
21 April 2020

Dysphagia is a term used to describe difficulty or discomfort in swallowing food, fluids and even saliva. It is usually caused by another health condition, such as stroke, head injury or dementia, and can affect people of all ages. Nurses play a key role in identifying and managing dysphagia and screening for malnutrition. A multidisciplinary approach is required to guide appropriate interventions and achieve the best outcomes. This article discusses the prevalence of dysphagia, as well as the signs and risk factors, before taking a closer look at management strategies to help ensure good nutritional status.

Topics:  Nutrition
16 April 2019

There are a number of clinical conditions that result in dysphagia (difficulties swallowing food and drink). Sometimes dysphagia can resolve, however, for many it can be long term and also continue to deteriorate over time as the disease progresses. Successful management of dysphagia requires provision of differing levels of texture modification to an individual’s food and fluid consistency. It is important that this is assessed correctly so that the individual receives the appropriate consistency to swallow safely. If an inappropriate consistency is given, this can result in aspiration pneumonia, which can have fatal consequences. If individuals are given a consistency which has been over modified so that it is softer or thicker than required, their pleasure in food and drinks can be reduced unnecessarily, risking malnutrition and dehydration. This article introduces the differing consistencies which are recommended and the consequences that can result from incorrect consistencies being given. It also discusses suitable foods and fluids to meet both the requirements of the differing texture modifications and nutritional components of these consistencies.

Topics:  Elderly
12 February 2019

A pressure ulcer is localised damage to the skin and/or underlying tissue, usually over a bony prominence (or related to a medical or other device), resulting from sustained pressure (including pressure associated with shear). The damage can be present as intact skin or an open ulcer and may be painful (NHS Improvement, 2018a). The consequences of pressure ulcers are increased length of hospital stays for the patient, estimated at 4.31 days (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence [NICE], 2005), but also an increase in cost to the NHS, which is identified at around £14-21 billion annually (Nutritional Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel et al, 2014). Poor nutrition has been recognised as one of the risk factors in the development of pressure ulcers. Improving nutritional intake of patients is thus paramount in reducing patient harm and unnecessary cost. This article looks at the role nutrition plays in the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers, provides practical advice and signposts readers to the resources produced by the Nutrition and Pressure Ulcer Task and Finish Group. 

Topics:  Wound healing
05 October 2018

Healthy eating is a topic covered widely in the media, and is particularly relevant to healthcare, with diet and nutrition vital to the management and prevention of many conditions. Wound healing is a complex process that relies on the coordination and internal regulation of activities such as the removal of devitalised tissue and growth of fresh blood vessels. This article examines the phases of wound healing and discusses how nutrients can affect and enhance this process. Understanding the role of nutrients in wound care enables nurses to offer advice to patients whose wounds are not progressing in the expected manner. Nutrition should form part of holistic wound assessment, with any malnourished patient being referred to a dietician. It is a misconception that only underweight individuals can be malnourished and the use of a robust assessment tool will assist nurses in deciding which patients require onward referral. There appears to be a significant link between poor nutrition and delayed wound healing, with a higher risk of complications such as infection identified in malnourished patients

Topics:  Wounds
05 March 2018

A new, practical and informative guide to bolus feeding has been launched by Nutricia in response to requests from healthcare professionals, as this form of feeding is becoming more frequently used in clinical practice.

Topics:  tube feeding