Lymphoedema Resources

10 August 2020

To effectively deal with complex wounds, the importance of oedema and that all oedemas are on a lymphoedema continuum needs to be understood. The efficiency of lymphatic drainage is paramount to oedema management and wound healing. Therefore, interventions to help prevent damage to lymphatic capillaries, and techniques to facilitate lymphatic drainage and lymphangiogenesis should be considered as part of wound management. This article highlights the importance of the lymphatic system in the treatment of leg ulceration and the emergence of a new ‘hybrid nurse’, who combines the specialisms of tissue viability and lymphoedema to improve patient outcomes, reduce waiting times, and improve efficiency within the NHS with the provision of a one-stop service.

10 August 2020

To effectively deal with complex wounds, the importance of oedema and that all oedemas are on a lymphoedema continuum needs to be understood. The efficiency of lymphatic drainage is paramount to oedema management and wound healing. Therefore, interventions to help prevent damage to lymphatic capillaries, and techniques to facilitate lymphatic drainage and lymphangiogenesis should be considered as part of wound management. This article highlights the importance of the lymphatic system in the treatment of leg ulceration and the emergence of a new ‘hybrid nurse’, who combines the specialisms of tissue viability and lymphoedema to improve patient outcomes, reduce waiting times, and improve efficiency within the NHS with the provision of a one-stop service.

09 October 2018

Many government and healthcare strategies now advocate supporting self-care in the management of long-term conditions (LTCs). This approach has been driven by the increasing number of poly-morbid, obese and elderly people in the UK, which is putting an immense strain on already stretched health and social care resources. The emphasis on promoting self-care throughout the illness trajectory has been a pivotal aspect of nursing care for more than 50 years and this approach in the management of chronic oedema has always been a key aspect of treatment plans by specialists in this field. Practitioners need to be skilled in assessing the self-care needs of patients and to be ready to adopt this approach and provide appropriate support. This article gives an overview of self-care for people with chronic oedema and focuses on how nurses can encourage and support patients to do this. A case study demonstrates the importance of thorough and accurate assessment to encourage self-care and health behaviour change.

05 October 2018

Lower limb ulceration is a common, debilitating and costly condition that accounts for over one third of chronic wounds in the UK. The most common underlying causes of leg and foot ulceration are venous insufficiency, arterial insufficiency, lymphoedema and diabetic neuropathy. More than half of leg ulcers do not have a recorded diagnosis and are unlikely to receive appropriate care. Poor care can cost up to ten times as much as appropriate care. The Legs Matter campaign aims to change this situation through a public health campaign supported by a website: http://legsmatter.org. The website provides clearly written, easily accessible information for patients, the public and generalist healthcare professionals along with signposts to reputable sources of information. In this way, the campaign aims to raise awareness that leg and foot conditions can be improved with the right care. 

08 November 2017

Compression is the key to management of lymphoedema and multilayer bandaging has been considered the gold standard. This article looks at adjustable Velcro compression devices as an alternative to multilayer bandaging. The author finds that the devices enable patients to maintain the required pressure in between consultations with healthcare professionals. They also allow for changes in limb volume and can help with concordance, as well as cutting down on the time clinicians need to spend with patients as the devices promote self-management.

11 August 2017

This article is the second in a two-part series on managing common lower limb problems encountered in primary care. The first article in the series (Brown, 2017) discussed the causes of oedema and its relation to underlying conditions, such as venous disease, lymphoedema and lipoedema. This article investigates skin care, the management of ‘wet legs’ and the different types of compression therapy available to non-specialist community nurses.

Topics:  Lipoedema
09 May 2017

This article focuses on the work of a team of community nurses running a primary care drop-in centre. As well as a full range of clinic services, the team sees a lot of leg ulcer patients for compression bandaging. A common problem with traditional compression bandaging is the amount of time that community nurses have to spend on the procedure, as well as the dangers of maintaining pressure and bandage slippage between dressing appointments, which can result in discomfort for patients and even skin damage in some cases. This also has implications for patient concordance. This article looks at a review by the team of a new compression system (juxtacures®; medi UK), which offers measurable and adjustable compression and a greater involvement by patients in their own care, which in turn can minimise the time nurses need to spend on dressing changes.

05 June 2015

By reading the article, you can learn all about the key principles of subjects that are vital to your role as a community nurse. Once you have read the article, visit www.jcn.co.uk/learning-zone/ to evaluate your knowledge on this topic by answering the 10 questions in the e-learning unit; all answers can be found in the article. If you answer the questions correctly, you can download your certificate, which can be used in your continuing professional development (CPD) portfolio as evidence of your continued learning.

Compression therapy can play a vital role in improving the quality of life for those with chronic venous insufficiency, chronic oedema and lymphoedema (Lymphoedema Framework, 2006; World Union of Wound Healing Societies [WUWHS], 2008). In particular, compression bandaging can facilitate wound healing and oedema reduction in the treatment phase of management, before further healing and maintenance with compression hosiery.

Topics:  Lymphoedema