Wound Care

Topic Articles

207 result(s) for the key topic Wound Care were found:

Community nurses’ experiences of treating patients with leg ulcers
Community nurses offer holistic nursing care to patients at home, including attending to people with leg ulcers. It is known that leg ulcers can have a significant impact on patients’ quality of life. Nonetheless, little is known about community nurses’ views and experiences of providing holistic leg ulcer care and, in particular, their insights into the impact of leg ulcers on patients’ quality of life. Using a focus group of five healthcare support workers and four individual interviews with two associate nurses and two district nurses, this study explored community nurses’ experience of attending to patients with leg ulcers. Following transcription of the data, a thematic analysis was undertaken. It was concluded that community nurses need more training to support their work in leg ulcer management and more time to deliver patient-centred care.
December 2014 : Volume 28, Issue 6
How to accurately identify and record pressure ulceration
The accurate grading or staging (henceforth referred to as grading in this article) of pressure ulcers has become increasingly important over the past five years as healthcare organisations insist on each wound being accurately documented (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence [NICE], 2014a, b). The impetus to capture improved data on pressure ulcers has been driven both by the need to reduce the impact of these debilitating wounds on patients, but also to bring down the spiralling costs to the NHS associated with their treatment. However it is not always easy to grade a pressure ulcer and the accuracy of any conclusions can be affected by multiple factors such as the presence of necrotic tissue, the colour of the individual's skin and the skill of the clinician, whether nurse, therapist, doctor, podiatrist or healthcare assistant. This article examines the basic principles of grading pressure ulcers, particularly where there may be conflicting signs and indications, and also investigates so-called 'ungradeable' pressure damage and how community nurses might reasonably interpret the guidelines on this.
October 2014 : Volume 28, Issue 5
Wound care in the community: infection, exudate and conformability
Community nurses require a wide skill set to deal with the variety of clinical presentations they meet in any given day. This includes wound care, which can present nurses with a range of  management challenges, i.e. how to combat infection, which kind of dressings to use to control exudate volume and how to ensure that dressings provide patient comfort and do not further damage the wound or skin on removal. It is important, therefore, that community nurses have access to a range of versatile products that can be used in a variety of clinical situations and which are also cost-effective. This article examines some of the common wound care issues that community nurses can face, as well as looking at how a versatile wound dressing (Durafiber® Ag; Smith & Nephew) — which has a variety of applications in primary care — can help with some of these issues.
October 2014 : Volume 28, Issue 5
A compression bandage system that helps to promote patient wellbeing
Compression bandages provide the mainstay of treatment for venous diseases and their sequellae of ulceration and oedema. Selection should depend not only on the effectiveness and cost of treatment, but also on patient acceptability. If correctly applied, compression bandages provide sustained graduated pressure. This article explores the negative impact that having a leg ulcer can have on patient quality of life and introduces a new, moisturising, odour-reducing inelastic two-layer compression bandaging system that aims to improve patient wellbeing and comfort which, in turn, promotes concordance.
August 2014 : Volume 28, Issue 4
How wound cleansing and debriding aids management and healing
Wound debridement can be challenging for community nurses, who need to be able to quickly identify a wound’s status in order to proceed with treatment. This article looks at some of the basic factors that nurses should consider when debriding and cleaning a wound, paying particular attention to assessment and ‘seeing’ the wound, and how clinicians can better remove potentially damaging material such as slough and necrosis. The article also investigates how clinicians caring for patients with leg ulceration can treat the ‘whole leg’. Finally, the authors consider the benefits of a new product, the UCS® debridement cloth (medi UK), and its ability to help community nurses gently debride and clean wounds of all types, as well as reducing the burden of using buckets of water to clean patients’ lower limbs. This has important implications for many community nurses, particularly concerning strain to the back during lower limb cleansing and the infection risk of transporting, cleaning and storing buckets in patients’ homes. There is also a time factor, as debridement cloths mean that visiting nurses can reduce the time associated with filling and emptying buckets in both clinic and home environments.
August 2014 : Volume 28, Issue 4
Implementing pressure ulcer prevention in a Welsh nursing home
Pressure ulcers represent expensive adverse events and are a significant cause of pain and distress to patients. This article examines a SKIN bundle approach that was implemented in a Welsh nursing home to assist in the prevention of pressure damage. An educational intervention specifically designed to aid implementation was put in place and a series of audits were performed to collect nursing team members’ knowledge of pressure ulcer prevention and occurrence. The authors outline how staff’s knowledge scores increased dramatically following education and how pressure ulcer prevalence subsequently remained low.
August 2014 : Volume 28, Issue 4
How to select the best compression hosiery for your patient
Venous and lymphatic disease both result in skin changes to the lower limb. These range from early disease signs such as mild oedema and dry skin, to varicose veins, leg ulceration and chronic oedema in the later stages. Patients at all stages of disease progression are commonly encountered in the community and compression hosiery plays a key role in the prevention and management of skin changes.
June 2014 : Volume 28, Issue 3
Understanding the basics of wound care in the community setting
The government's policy of moving care closer to home means that not only will community nurses continue to see patients with chronic wounds such as leg ulcers, pressure ulcers and diabetic foot ulcers, they may also start to see an increase in the numbers of patients who have been discharged from hospital with surgical wounds, who might previously have stayed in secondary care for a longer period. It is imperative that community nurses tasked with visiting a range of patients in their own homes have an understanding of the fundamentals of wound development and management to provide basic evidence-based wound care. This article looks at some of those fundamentals, including debridement, dressing application and removal, wound cleansing, infection, and the effects of comorbidities on the wound.
June 2014 : Volume 28, Issue 3
A solution to cost-effective wound management in the community
For community nurses faced with expanding case-loads and patients who are now being discharged earlier into the community, the sheer range of conditions they come across means that cost-effective and practical, clinically-effective solutions are at a premium. This is particularly true in wound care, where nurses in the community need products that can be used on a variety of wound types that are also cost-effective. This article looks at the range of wound care knowledge needed by generalist nurses, before focusing on one dressing in particular, Silflex® (Advancis Medical, Nottinghamshire). With its all-round versatility, Silflex provides a balance of usability and cost-effectiveness.
April 2014 : Volume 28, Issue 2
Psychological aspects of wound care: implications for clinical practice
Chronic wounds have many psychosocial consequences, including stress, negative mood, pain, and social isolation. In addition to these, frequent dressing changes can cause the individual anxiety and stress. This article explores how wound management can influence both psychological outcomes and, potentially, the rate of healing. Implications for practice are identified, which need to be successfully employed to ensure that patient health is maximised and that the stress and pain associated with wound care are minimised in order that wound healing is improved.
April 2014 : Volume 28, Issue 2
What nurses need to know about the application of larval therapy
In chronic wound management the potential for healing increases following effective debridement. Indeed, it has been suggested that debridement’s effect on chronic wound healing is similar in impact to the relief of pressure in preventing pressure ulceration. Debridement can be performed using a number of methods, but larval debridement has recognised benefits, including the breakdown of necrotic tissue; removal of microbes; wound cleansing; and breakdown of biofilm. The reduction of malodour in the wound can also help increase patients’ self-esteem and overall wellbeing. This article looks at the use of larval therapy in a community setting, which can be particularly cost-effective as rapid debridement swiftly reduces the bacterial load, helping to lessen the potential for hospital admission.
April 2014 : Volume 28, Issue 2
Exit site management in the community using Kendall™ AMD Antimicrobial Foam Dressing with PHMB
Exit sites are commonly encountered in the community setting as a result of a shift in clinical practice that means more patients with complex conditions are being managed at home. The management of exit sites varies according to indication, but there are principles of practice that are common to all sites, and these are outlined in this article. Kendall™ AMD Antimicrobial Foam Dressing with PHMB has been used to successfully prevent and manage infection of exit sites, and to manage overgranulation, a common complication of these wounds.
January 2014 : Volume 28, Issue 1
Understanding the impact of leg ulcer bandaging on patient quality of life
Literature has shown that patients with leg ulcers can have a significantly poorer quality of life compared to those without leg ulcers. In addition, research has identified problematic relationships between patients with leg ulcers and practitioners, such as community nurses. The author contends that this mismatch needs to be addressed in order to improve patient quality of life through leg ulcer bandaging. He makes several recommendations for practice and highlights that community practitioners need to use innovative practice to help improve the quality of leg ulcer bandaging care they deliver. The overall aim of this article is to establish the extent of community practitioners’ understanding of the impact of leg ulcer bandaging on patient quality of life.
January 2014 : Volume 28, Issue 1
Using natural properties to manage chronic wounds
An advanced wound care dressing that uses a natural resource in its ability to absorb and retain moisture as well as to provide antimicrobial properties, offers a new multi-functional, biointeractive protease modulator to the wound dressing arena. Several factors indicate the need for such a dressing, namely: an ageing population inevitably increases the prevalence of wounds managed across acute and community settings, the prevention and management of infection remains a priority and the use of natural resources is becoming more important. This article considers the literature supporting this product and, using care study examples, demonstrates its potential impact on patient outcomes.
January 2014 : Volume 28, Issue 1
A modern dressing range to meet today’s wound care challenges
With more and more advanced wound dressings becoming available, clinicians need to be selective when choosing the most appropriate treatment for patients with wounds in the community. Dressings are no longer tasked simply with protecting wounds and offering some level of absorbency, but need to be able to address both the physical and psychological aspects of having a wound to ensure patient-centred care. The sorbion range of dressings are developed to offer clinical solutions and provide cost-effective care.
November 2013 : Volume 27, Issue 5
How often should patients in compression have ABPI recorded?
This article outlines a survey that was undertaken in the community to find out how often patients with venous disease who are wearing compression hosiery have their ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI) monitored. It also asked clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) their opinion on the desired frequency of ABPI follow-up, and which patient groups they considered to be most at-risk. The survey findings highlight the lack of consensus and consistency in follow-up care. The majority of CNSs identified potential high-risk patient groups, the majority of which have their ABPI monitored every three months. However, there were inconsistencies in time interval for follow-up in patients with similar risk factors.
November 2013 : Volume 27, Issue 5
Management of patients with heel-located pressure damage
Pressure ulcers are a significant problem in both the acute sector and the community, where nurses can spend a great deal of their time dealing with what is a painful and debilitating condition. As government policy encourages more care to be delivered in patients’ homes, finding solutions to pressure damage that aid healing and improve patients’ quality of life, as well as being cost-effective, is paramount. This article examines the background to pressure damage, as well as looking at its effect on community nurses’ workload. In particular, it focuses on the heel as a common site of pressure damage.
November 2013 : Volume 27, Issue 5
Management of venous leg ulcers: assess, dress and compress
Venous leg ulcers are a common problem in the community, with which nurses should be familiar if they are to combat the pain, social isolation and depression that accompany this debilitating condition.
November 2013 : Volume 27, Issue 5
The clinical performance of a silicone foam in an NHS community trust
The NHS spends the majority of its budget on labour costs and it could be argued that frontline staff such as community nurses are the organisation’s most valuable resource. However, optimal wound care is dependent upon effective patient engagement, the application of clinical expertise and access to wound management products. The tension between increasing demands for services and the number of nurses is already causing problems in care provision as staff cuts and excessive workload inevitably endanger patient care. Enhancing efficiency through the use of innovative products will become essential in the future if nurses are to continue to provide expert care against a backdrop of cost-savings. This article details the appraisal process undertaken within Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust to investigate the in-practice clinical performance of a silicone foam dressing (Allevyn™ Life Smith & Nephew, Hull).
November 2013 : Volume 27, Issue 5
Assessment, management and prevention of infected wounds
For the patient, wound infection can lead to poor healing outcomes and has the potential to result in life-threatening sepsis. For healthcare services, additional expense can be incurred due to the need for remedial treatment and extra clinician time. Poor wound infection rates malso attract negative publicity and damage the public’s perception of care standards. This article examines the essential roles played by prevention of infection, early diagnosis and the initiation of effective management strategies.
September 2013 : Volume 27, Issue 4
Dealing with wound-related pain at dressing change
Numerous studies have shown that pain during dressing change is a major issue for patients with both acute and chronic wounds. Despite this evidence, pain is often misunderstood by clinicians and can be poorly managed. Pain can result in patients abandoning dressing regimens and clinicians need to ensure that patients have their pain reduced as much as possible and do not have to face the trauma of repeated painful dressing changes. This article presents some of the causes of pain and outlines some strategies that clinicians can use to prevent or minimise their patients’ pain.
September 2013 : Volume 27, Issue 4
Pressure-reducing pads effectively prevent and reverse signs of category 1 pressure damage
Ongoing changes to the NHS (Department of Health [DH] 2010a–c) mean that clinicians responsible for the delivery of wound care need to reduce expenditure while meeting the increasing demand for the provision of quality care (DH 2010a–c). The high impact action (HIA), Your SkinmMatters, identified ‘no avoidable pressure ulcers’ in NHS care settings as a vital improvement to the quality of patient experience and cost effectiveness (NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement, 2010).
September 2013 : Volume 27, Issue 4
Superabsorbent dressings — have we reached maximum capacity?
Exudate management is one of the key challenges for clinicians who have to deal with wounds. The World Union of Wound Healing Societies (WUWHS, 2007) highlighted the importance of appropriate dressing selection for exudate control and removal of excess exudate. Correct dressing selection ensures that the wound bed remains moist without becoming saturated, which in turn prevents damage and pain to the surrounding skin and reduces the risk of infection from strikethrough. This article examines the role of exudate in wound healing, and the inherent challenges in its management, both for patients and carers. The role of superabsorbent dressings is discussed and the findings of an evaluation of clinicians’ requirements and expectations of superabsorbent dressings are presented.
September 2013 : Volume 27, Issue 4
The CHROSS Checker: a tool kit to detect early skin changes associated with venous and lymphovenous disease
In patients with venous and lymphovenous disease, skin changes to the lower limb(s) occur gradually, and become more serious over time if left untreated. The CHRonic Oedema Signs and Symptoms (CHROSS) Checker is a tool kit consisting of an assessment chart and key cards that have been developed to help clinicians easily identify the skin changes that occur as a result of underlying venous and lymphovenous disease, when carrying out holistic patient assessment. It also provides clear guidance on which compression products can be used to manage the disease type and severity of skin change. For clinicians unfamiliar with some or all of the signs and symptoms listed on the CHROSS Checker chart, the key cards contain further information in the form of a photograph, definition and cause of each sign and symptom listed. This article will describe the theory behind the development of the CHROSS Checker tools and explain how to use them in clinical practice.
September 2013 : Volume 27, Issue 4
The use of compression hosiery in mixed aetiology ulceration and palliative care
The UK has an expanding elderly population, which means that in the future nurses and clinicians who work in community-based units, such as nursing homes and hospices, will increasingly encounter age-related conditions such as palliative oedema and mixed aetiology ulceration. This article looks at duomed soft®, (medi UK, Hereford) a new hosiery solution, which is not only easy to apply, making patient self-care more likely, but also provides consistent mild compression in a format that is more cosmetically acceptable to patients.
September 2013 : Volume 27, Issue 4
Abnormal scarring: an overview
An estimated 23 million adults in the UK have some sort of scar. Normal scars are preceded by injury, immediate in onset, flat and asymptomatic. These are the most common type of scar and are a result of the body’s natural healing process. Hypertrophic and keloid scars occur when the healing process is deranged.
May 2013 : Volume 27, Issue 3
Cost effectiveness and improved patient outcomes using a super-absorbent dressing
In some chronic wounds, excessive exudate can inhibit wound healing. Clinicians must manage the wound, ensure cost and clinical effectiveness and a positive patient experience as mismanagement may lead to non-concordance. This article discusses the evaluation of absorbent products within a community provider organisation, and includes patient feedback and opinions of the clinicians delivering the care.
May 2013 : Volume 27, Issue 3
Evaluation of a new two component inelastic compression bandage kit
The focus of compression bandaging has been directed towards ease of application, comfort, tolerability and effectiveness. This article reports on a two-centre non-comparative evaluation of the new two component short-stretch bandage kit (Actico®2C) in a case series with the aim of establishing how comfortable and effective the bandage is in a real life situation.
May 2013 : Volume 27, Issue 3
Using a hydroconductive dressing: a case series
This article explores how effective exudate control and debridement can promote wound bed preparation and presents a 10-patient case series where Drawtex®, an advanced hydroconductive wound dressing with LevaFiber™ technology, improved the lives of patients with chronic wounds.
May 2013 : Volume 27, Issue 3
Reviewing the effectiveness of larval therapy
Throughout history, it has been observed that wounds tended to heal more quickly with fewer complications when larvae found their way onto open wounds. Larval therapy (LT) is used for the debridement of chronic wounds and to create a wound bed conductive to effective healing. The aim of this article is to discuss the effectiveness of larval therapy for the debridement of chronic wounds through a critical analysis of the relevant literature.
March 2013 : Volume 27, Issue 2
Academia and clinical practice – working together successfully to develop skin integrity knowledge and skills
Clinicians often find it difficult to devote sufficient time to develop proposals that will investigate issues that enhance the patient experience. Thus, clinicians need to access researchers and academics who can assist in developing research proposals, undertake service evaluation, audit current practice, provide advice on best practice and offer education that maintains clinical knowledge and skills.
January 2013 : Volume 27, Issue 1
Cleansing chronic wounds with tap water or saline: a review
Objective: In Slovenia, community nurses usually use tap water as a cleanser for chronic wounds, but is this the best practice? The purpose of this review is to establish if there is any difference in healing and infection rates when wounds are cleaned with tap water instead of sterile saline.
January 2013 : Volume 27, Issue 1
Lindsay Leg Clubs: clinically effective, cost effective
Economic studies of leg ulcer management strategies have mainly concentrated on different compression, dressing and pharmaceutical products rather than different modes of delivery or systems of care.
January 2013 : Volume 27, Issue 1
A multi-centre observational study examining the effects of a mechanical debridement system
Wound debridement plays an essential role in preparing the wound to heal and can be achieved in several ways. Most wound debridement requires the skills of specialist practitioners which can be both time consuming and expensive. This observational study looks at a new mechanical debridement system with a monofilament fibre pad that can be used in any healthcare setting with minimal training. In twenty patients with wounds and/or skin that required debridement, the new system was found to be a fast and effective method of debridement causing minimal pain to the patients. This new approach to wound debridement could potentially have far reaching benefits to the patient, the nurse and the organisation.
November 2012 : Volume 26, Issue 6
Identifying patients at risk of pressure ulcers
Pressure ulcer prevention is a challenge both in acute care and in community care, although prevalence is hard to determine due to differing ways of assessing and reporting both ulcers and risk of ulceration. Those who are acutely ill or have compromised mobility, or are older, or who have multiple co-morbidities are at greater risk of pressure ulcer development.
November 2012 : Volume 26, Issue 6
Diabetic foot ulcers
The cost of diabetic foot ulcer management is estimated at around £300 million a year, but the true prevalence of diabetic foot disease is unknown, making the potential economic and personal burden of diabetes treatment and complications inestimable. This article will explore diabetic foot aetiology, risk factors for diabetic foot disease, prevention strategies and briefly discuss the management of people with diabetic foot disease
September 2012 : Volume 26, Issue 5
Venous leg ulcers in context
People with leg ulceration are predominantly treated in a community setting either in their own home, a clinic or a general practice surgery. Access to high quality, effective care is vital for timely healing. This article will consider aspects of the National Health Service quality agenda and how these align to leg ulcer care using national venous leg ulcer guidelines as a framework. The purpose of this is to prompt both practitioners and managers to consider the current provision of leg ulcer care and how this might stand up to scrutiny from a quality perspective.
July 2012 : Volume 26, Issue 4
Negative Pressure Wound Therapy: right for the wound but is it right for the patient?
In a short reflective exercise, the introduction of disposable Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) was shown to improve the patient experience of being managed in the community with a complex wound. District nurses and treatment room staff found the system easy to use and in their view, it extended the interval required between dressing changes and time taken to carry out wound care. This article considers the benefits of NPWT, illustrating these with patient reflections and comments.
May 2012 : Volume 26, Issue 3
Devising a wound dressing formulary
Complex and chronic wounds present many challenges to the community nurse, not least identifying the most appropriate dressing from the plethora available. Coupled with the imperative that care is delivered in the most cost and clinically-effective manner, a carefully considered and evaluated formulary can help guide dressing choice and facilitate monitoring of usage and costs.
In this article, a runner-up in the JCN Writing Awards, Caroline Swayne reflects on the impact of a formulary in her organisation.
January 2012 : Volume 26, Issue 1
Dressing awkward wounds
Maureen Benbow discusses some basic strategies for dressing wounds and tips for dressing the more difficult to dress wounds located in awkward places, their correct application, maintenance and removal.
November 2011 : Volume 25, Issue 6
Management of minor burn injuries
Jacky Edwards presents a practical guide to management of minor burn injuries to ensure their management is timely and effective.
September 2011 : Volume 25, Issue 5
Using Debrisoft® for wound debridement
Maureen Benbow briefly considers different methods of wound debridement and focuses on the advantages associated with a novel, alternative method of debridement.
September 2011 : Volume 25, Issue 5
Improving pressure ulcer care
Edwin Chamanga discusses how one community health service is improving pressure ulcer prevention and treatment by means of accurate pressure ulcer assessments, documentation and implementation of innovative ideas
July 2011 : Volume 25, Issue 4
Debridement: wound bed preparation
Maureen Benbow explores a range of approaches to debridement
May 2011 : Volume 25, Issue 3
Healing a chronic wound using Promogran Prisma
Lisa Martin discusses a case study which looks at the effectiveness of Promogran Prisma in the management of a wound of seven years duration.
May 2011 : Volume 25, Issue 3
Management of a fungating wound
Lynne Watret discusses the importance of appropriate dressing choices in the management of fungating wounds
March 2011 : Volume 25, Issue 2
Scar therapies
Jacky Edwards discusses some of the different scar therapies available and the impact this can have on patients/clients who have a scar
March 2011 : Volume 25, Issue 2
KerraMax®: managing highly exuding wounds
Sylvie Hampton discusses the use of KerraMax®, a superabsorbent dressing, in the management of exuding wounds
January 2011 : Volume 25, Issue 1
Transforming community leg ulcer services
Diane Blockley, Lindsey Large, Lynn Spencer & Claire Rashid outline how they approached the need for providing evidence on the recurrence rate of venous leg ulcers for the Commissioning for Quality and Innovation (CQUIN) scheme and discusses the implications for patients and community nurses.
January 2011 : Volume 25, Issue 1
An evaluation of the use of PolyMem Silver in burn management
Jacky Edwards & Sally Mason review the efficacy of PolyMem Silver dressings
November 2010 : Volume 24, Issue 6
International pressure ulcer guidelines
Maureen Benbow gives an overview of pressure ulcer prevention clinical guidelines.
November 2010 : Volume 24, Issue 6
Leg ulcer management: a cost-effectiveness case study
Alison Thompson and Emily Steventon discuss a cost effectiveness case study which looks at improving quality and reducing costs in community leg ulcer management.
November 2010 : Volume 24, Issue 6
Accel-Heal®: a new therapy for chronic wounds
Martin Tadej, Dr Steve Young & Sylvie Hampton discuss their use of Accel-Heal®, a Class IIA medical device that proved to be particularly effective in the management of non-healing wounds
September 2010 : Volume 24, Issue 5
Ageing & wound healing
Maureen Benbow explores the impact of ageing in relation to skin care and wound healing
September 2010 : Volume 24, Issue 5
Living with a chronic leg ulcer
Olivia Byrne & Marcella Kelly discuss a study which explored older Irish peoples’ experience of living with a chronic venous leg ulcer in the community.
September 2010 : Volume 24, Issue 5
Larval therapy: is it effective against MRSA?
Rebecca Laurie analyses the current literature available on larval therapy and MRSA eradication. By highlighting the findings in key literature this article aims to provide the clinician with strong evidence to promote larval therapy as a treatment of choice for MRSA infected wounds rather than one of last resort
July 2010 : Volume 24, Issue 4
A critical review of the Waterlow tool
Edwin Tapiwa Chamanga discusses the use of the Waterlow assessment tool in wound management
May 2010 : Volume 24, Issue 3
Emollients and ageing skin
Maureen Benbow discusses the use of emollients for dry ageing skin
March 2010 : Volume 24, Issue 2
Honey treatments for wounds
Excellence in Practice Awards 2009 runner up – Amy Cray presents a literature review on the effectiveness of honey dressings on infected wounds.
March 2010 : Volume 24, Issue 2
Preventing heel ulceration
Dr Karen Ousey gives an overview of the prevention and aetiology of heel pressure ulcers
January 2010 : Volume 24, Issue 1
Quality of life and pressure ulcers
Maureen Benbow gives an overview of living with a pressure ulcer
December 2009 : Volume 23, Issue 12
Let’s talk continence – international style
British Continence Specialist Nurse Joanne Whiteley reports from the 39th Annual Meeting of the International Continence Society in San Francisco, USA
November 2009 : Volume 23, Issue 11
Moisture lesion or pressure ulcer?
Student nurse Celene Gibbon reviews the literature surrounding sacral moisture lesions and sacral pressure damage and the challenges of misdiagnosis and subsequent mismanagement of the wound.
October 2009 : Volume 23, Issue 10
Identifying, managing and treating skin tears
Dr Karen Ousey discusses the aetiology and classification of skin tears
September 2009 : Volume 23, Issue 9
Chronic wounds – an overview
Dr Karen Ousey gives an overview of the wound healing process of hard to heal or chronic wounds.
July 2009 : Volume 23, Issue 7
Exploring pressure ulcer prevention
Dr Karen Ousey briefly explores the prevention of pressure ulcer development and tissue damage
May 2009 : Volume 23, Issue 5
Sharp debridement of a pressure ulcer
Marcia Gore discusses the sharp debridement of pressure ulcers in the community setting
April 2009 : Volume 23, Issue 4
Use of honey on a neuropathic ulcer
Laurie Chapman discusses the use of ­honey on a neuropathic ulcer and the research that influenced the nurse’s choice of dressing.
February 2009 : Volume 23, Issue 2
Skin tears
Maureen Benbow explores the implications of ageing on skin and the impact on the development of skin tears, prevention and treatment strategies
January 2009 : Volume 23, Issue 1
Debridement and the removal of devitalised tissue
Maureen Benbow explores the implications of the presence of devitalised tissue in the chronic, non-healing wound and the range of available debridement methods
Maureen Benbow MSc BA RGN HERC is a Senior Lecturer, University of Chester
Article accepted for publication: September 2008
December 2008 : Volume 22, Issue 12
Preventing venous ulceration
Runner up in the JCN Excellence in Practice Awards, Modupe Iwuji discusses the need to prevent venous ulceration
Modupe Iwuji RGN, BSc (Hons), PGCE is studying for an MSc Community Specialist Practice at the University of Brighton and is employed by West Sussex NHS PCT
October 2008 : Volume 22, Issue 10
Update on larval therapy
Maureen Benbow explores the background to the use of larval therapy and its clinical application.
Maureen Benbow MSc BA RGN HERC: Senior Lecturer, University of Chester
Article accepted for publication: June 2008
October 2008 : Volume 22, Issue 10
Management of bleeding and malodour in fungating wounds
Runner up in the JCN Excellence in Practice Awards, Helen Lloyd gives an overview of management of complicated wounds in the community
Helen Lloyd RGN works at PCT Hull, East Riding of Yorkshire
September 2008 : Volume 22, Issue 9
Management of a patient using VAC therapy
Irene Speding gives an overview of a case study using VAC therapy in the community
Irene Speding BSc (Hons), RGN, DN Cert, Dip Diabetes/Stoma Care is a Tissue Viability Nurse, South of Tyne & Wear NHS Trust serving Gateshead & Sunderland PCT
Article accepted for publication: January 2008

Acknowledgements:
With thanks to Christine Morris, clinical education specialist for her help and advice and KCI Medical for help in preparing the manuscript.
July 2008 : Volume 22, Issue 7
Necrotising fasciitis
Maureen Benbow discusses a case study of a man affected by necrotising fasciitis
Maureen Benbow MSc, BA, RGN, HERC, Senior Lecturer, University of Chester
Article accepted for publication: March 2008
July 2008 : Volume 22, Issue 7
Exploring wound management and measuring quality of life
Maureen Benbow discusses the effect a chronic wound may have on the individual
Maureen Benbow MSc, BA, RGN, HERC, Senior Lecturer, University of Chester
Article accepted for publication: March 2008
June 2008 : Volume 22, Issue 6
The management of chronic oedema
Irene Speding gives a brief overview of a case study involving a lady with chronic oedema
Irene Speding, RGN, NDNcert, BSc (Hons), Dip Diabetic Care/Stoma Care is a Tissue Viability Nurse Specialist, South of Tyne and Wear NHS Trust serving Sunderland & Gateshead PCT
Article accepted for publication: September 2007
June 2008 : Volume 22, Issue 6
Treating sinus wounds
Sylvie Hampton, Dr Steve Young and Andy Kerr discuss the treatment of sinus wounds
Sylvie Hampton MA, BSc (Hons), DpSN, RGN is a Tissue Viability Consultant
Dr Steve Young BSc, PhD
Andy Kerr RGN, DipN is a Tissue Viability Consultant, Eastbourne Wound Healing Centre
Article accepted for publication: March 2008
June 2008 : Volume 22, Issue 6
Understanding the pH balance in wound healing
Sylvie Hampton gives an overview of the science of pH balance in wound management.
Sylvie Hampton MA BSc (Hons) DpSN RGN is a Tissue Viability Consultant, Eastbourne’s Wound Healing Centre, Eastbourne
Article accepted for publication: March 2008
May 2008 : Volume 22, Issue 5
Venous leg ulceration: concordance
Sue Dillaway discusses the need for full holistic assessment of a patient’s needs when trying to increase compliance and concordance in leg ulcer management.
Sue Dillaway RGN is a Practice Nurse, East Sussex
Article accepted for publication: March 2007
May 2008 : Volume 22, Issue 5
The diabetic foot and its management
Using case studies Alison Williams discusses the management of diabetic foot ulcers
Alison Williams AHP, D.PodM is a Diabetes Podiatrist, Calderdale & Huddersfield NHS Trust, West Yorkshire
Article accepted for publication: October 2007
April 2008 : Volume 22, Issue 4
Best practice - appliance of dressing products
Maureen Benbow gives and overview of how to select dressing products and apply them in practice situations
Maureen Benbow MSc, BA, RGN, HERC is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Chester.
Article accepted for publication: January 2008
March 2008 : Volume 22, Issue 3
Modern wound therapies
Maureen Benbow gives an overview of just some of the vast range of modern wound therapies available to community nurses
Maureen Benbow MSc BA RGN HERC is a Senior Lecturer, University of Chester
Article accepted for publication: December 2007
February 2008 : Volume 22, Issue 2
Managing leg ulcers
Maureen Benbow discusses the need for careful management of lower leg wounds
Maureen Benbow MSc BA RGN HERC is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Chester
Article accepted for publication: December 2007
January 2008 : Volume 22, Issue 1
Wound care, audit and patient involvement
Maureen Benbow discusses the professional and legal requirements of nurses when documenting care
Maureen Benbow. MSc BA RGN HERC
Senior Lecturer University of Chester
Article accepted for publication: September 2007
December 2007 : Volume 21, Issue 12
Honey as the new 'silver' dressing in wound care
Sylvie Hampton discusses the use honey in modern cost effective wound management
Sylvie Hampton, MA, BSc (Hons), DpSN, RGN, Tissue Viability Consultant, Eastbourne.
Article accepted for publication: June 2007
November 2007 : Volume 21, Issue 11
Bacteria and wound healing
Sylvie Hampton gives an overview of wound bacteria and their effect on wound healing
Sylvie Hampton MA BSc (Hons) DpSN RGN Tissue Viability ConsultantEastbourne
Article accepted for publication: August 2007
October 2007 : Volume 21, Issue 10
Healing and wound classification
Maureen Benbow describes the stages of wound healing and the need for nurses to undertake accurate wound assessment
Maureen Benbow MSc, BA, RGN, HERC is a Senior Lecturer, University of Chester
Article accepted for publication: June 2007
September 2007 : Volume 21, Issue 9
Diagnosing and assessing wounds
Maureen Benbow gives an overview of wound assessment and classification
Maureen Benbow is a Senior Lecturer at the Faculty of Health & Social Care, University of Chester
Article accepted for publication: June 2007
August 2007 : Volume 21, Issue 8
Patient assessment and wounds
Maureen Benbow continues her series of articles with an overview of patient assessment and wounds
Maureen Benbow MSc BA RGN HERC is a Senior Lecturer, University of Chester
Article accepted for publication: April 2007
July 2007 : Volume 21, Issue 7
Topical negative pressure: a systematic review of the available evidence
Maureen Benbow, Pauline Beldon, Martyn Butcher, Heather Newton, Sylvie Hampton & Helena Baxter discuss a project which was set up to investigate the extent of use of topical negative pressure therapy in primary care settings in the UK in 2004. The objective of this part of the project was to systematically review the available literature up to December 2004.
The systematic review was conducted by a group of tissue viability experts. The key areas explored in the review included clinical, operational, communication, support and safety/liability/governance issues. The review of the literature found that the articles were noticeably lacking in information regarding the five key areas investigated. This would make it difficult for clinicians to initiate effective service provision based on what was found in the literature.
Maureen Benbow, Senior Lecturer, University of Chester.
Pauline Beldon, Tissue Viability Nurse Consultant, Epsom & St Helier University Hospitals NHS Trust.
Martyn Butcher, Skin and Wound Care Service Manager/TVNS, Derriford Hospital Plymouth, Devon
Heather Newton, Nurse Consultant, Tissue Viability, Royal Cornwall Hospitals NHS Trust, Truro, Cornwall.
Sylvie Hampton, Nurse Consultant Tissue Viability, Tissue Viability Consultancy Services
Helena Baxter, Service Development Manager, Hinchingbrooke Hospital, Cambridgeshire.
Article accepted for publication: February 2007
June 2007 : Volume 21, Issue 6
Back to basics - skin and wounds
Maureen Benbow gives an overview of the structure and functions of the skin and discusses the financial implications to the health service of skin failure
Maureen Benbow MSc BA RGN HERC Senior Lecturer, University of Chester
Article accepted for publication: March 2007
May 2007 : Volume 21, Issue 5
Dressing formularies: an overview
Maureen Benbow gives an overview of wound dressing formularies
Maureen Benbow MSc BA RGN HERC is a Senior Lecturer, University of Chester
Article accepted for publication: February 2007
April 2007 : Volume 21, Issue 4
Community prescribing and wounds
Irene Cooke gives an overview of nurse prescribing in relation to wound management.
Irene Cooke, RGN, SCM, DN, MPH, BSc (Hons), Non-Medical Prescriber, PGCHE is a Senior Lecturer/Pathway Leader in District Nursing, University of Chester.
Article accepted for publication: January 2007
March 2007 : Volume 21, Issue 3
Clinical governance & accountability in wound care management
In her second article Maureen Benbow identifies the need for nurses to be aware of their accountability particularly within the fields of wound healing/management.
Maureen Benbow MSc, BA, RGN, HERC is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Chester.
Article accepted for publication: November 2006
February 2007 : Volume 21, Issue 2
Electric stimulation of chronic wounds
Electric stimulation (E-Stim) to initiate healing of recalcitrant wounds has been discussed in the literature for many years and many publications indicate its efficacy. This review by Keith Moore considers the clinical and laboratory evidence underpinning the use of E-Stim for treatment of chronic wounds.
Keith Moore PhD, BSc is a Freelance Scientist at WoundSci.
Article accepted for publication: December 2006
January 2007 : Volume 21, Issue 1
Where is tissue viability in 2007?
Maureen Benbow reflects on changing and current trends in relation to the emergence of the nursing specialty of tissue viability and how this has influenced the quality of patient care.
Maureen Benbow MSc, BA, RGN, HERC is Senior Lecturer at the University of Chester.
Article accepted for publication: December 2006
January 2007 : Volume 21, Issue 1
The history of skin camouflage in health care
Liz Hawkins gives an overview of the use of skin camouflage in health care.
Liz Hawkins RGN is Chair of the British Association of Skin Camouflage and is a Clinical Nurse Manager, Burns Centre, University Hospital of South Manchester NHS Foundation Trust.
Article accepted for publication: October 2006
December 2006 : Volume 20, Issue 12
Prescribing and silver wound products
Annemarie Brown discusses the development of a decision tree to inform community nurses' prescribing decisions for silver wound care products.
Annemarie Brown MSc, BSc(Hons), RGN, is a Tissue Viability Clinical Nurse Specialist at South East Essex PCT & West Essex PCT.
Article accepted for publication: May 2006
November 2006 : Volume 20, Issue 11
The diabetic foot: the role of a podiatrist
Alison Williams describes the role of the podiatrist in treating the diabetic foot.
Alison Williams AHP, D.Pod.M. is a Diabetes Podiatrist at Princess Royal Community Health Centre, Huddersfield, West Yorkshire.
Article accepted for publication: August 2006
November 2006 : Volume 20, Issue 11
Larval therapy in full thickness burns
Jacky Edwards gives an overview of burn wound management using maggots for wound debridement.Jacky Edwards, BSc (Hons) PGDE, DSPN, RGN is a Clinical Nurse Specialist, South Manchester University Hospitals Trust.
Article accepted for publication: May 2006
October 2006 : Volume 20, Issue 10
Treatment of a non-healing scar
Anna Gale gives an overview of the treatment of a non-healing past traumatic scar with cellulitis using Kerraboot®.
Anna Gale RGN Dip (HE), is a Community Staff Nurse, South West Dorset PCT.
Article accepted for publication: September 2006
October 2006 : Volume 20, Issue 10
Caring for a painful venous leg ulcer
Hanne Vogensen presents a case study which outlines the care of a Danish leg ulcer patient.
Hanne Vogensen, RN is a Tissue Viability Specialist, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark
Article accepted for publication: June 2006
September 2006 : Volume 20, Issue 9
Is tap water a safe alternative to normal saline for wound cleansing?
Sally Magson-Roberts reviews the evidence surrounding the use of tap water in wound cleansing in a bid to establish what current research suggests is safe and effective, thus ensuring quality patient care, whilst delivering a cost effective and equitable service.
Sally Magson-Roberts RGN, DN, BSc, Dip HE is a District Nursing Sister, Eastbourne Downs PCT.
Article accepted for publication: January 2006
August 2006 : Volume 20, Issue 8
Infection control in the community - do we have a problem?
Bernadine Wrobel & Beth Maryon describe a small scale study which looked at the incidence of MRSA infection in a busy London suburb.
Bernadine Wrobel, BSc (Hons), DN, RGN is Primary Care Team Leader/DN, Havering PCT.
Beth Maryon, SCPT, DN, RGN is Practice Development Support manager/DN, Havering PCT.
Article accepted for publication: January 2006
June 2006 : Volume 20, Issue 6
Holistic assessment of pain and chronic wounds
Maureen Benbow discusses the need for holistic assessment of pain in patients with chronic wounds.
Maureen Benbow MSc, BA, HERC, RGN is a Senior Lecturer, University of Chester.
Article accepted for publication: December 2005
May 2006 : Volume 20, Issue 5
An update on VAC therapy
Maureen Benbow gives an update on the use of VAC therapy for heavily exudating wounds in the community.
Maureen Benbow MSc, BA, HERC, RGN is a Senior Lecturer, University of Chester, Chester.
Article accepted for publication: December 2005
April 2006 : Volume 20, Issue 4
Ethics and wound management
Maureen Benbow gives an overview of the ethical issues that must be addressed when managing wounds. Maureen Benbow MSc, BA, HERC, RGN is a Senior Lecturer, University of Chester.
Article accepted for publication: January 2006
March 2006 : Volume 20, Issue 3
Kerraboot® case study
Anne Walker gives a brief overview of Kerraboot® – an innovative solution to the management of long-term ulcers.
Anne Walker, Vascular Nurse Specialist, North Cumbria Acute Hospitals NHS Trust, West Cumberland Hospital, Hensingham, Whitehaven, Cumbria CA28 8JG.
Article accepted for publication: November 2005
February 2006 : Volume 20, Issue 2
Managing wounds using a structured assessment tool
Celia Muir and Lynne Watret give an overview of how to recognise Pyoderma Gangrenosum by using a structured assessment tool (TIME).
Celia Muir BSc, RGN, Clinical Nurse Specialist Dermatology, North Glasgow Division
Lynne Watret MN, MA, RGN, Clinical Nurse Specialist Tissue Viability Primary Care Division, Greater Glasgow Health Board.
Article accepted for publication: December 2005
January 2006 : Volume 20, Issue 1
The use of silicone gel in hypertrophic scar management
Jacky Edwards gives an overview of the use of silicone gel in burn and scar management.
Jacky Edwards RGN, BSc (Hons), PGDE is a Clinical Nurse Specialist, Burns Centre, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester.
Article accepted for publication: November 2005
December 2005 : Volume 19, Issue 12
Antibiotic resistant bacteria - do all dressings need a silver lining?
Jacky Edwards gives an overview of the differing types of silver dressing available to district nurses.
Jacky Edwards RGN, BSc (Hons), PGDE, Dip N, ENB 264, N49 is a Clinical Nurse Specialist, Burns Centre, Wythenshawe Hospital.
Article accepted for publication: June 2005
November 2005 : Volume 19, Issue 11
Diabetic foot management
Maureen Benbow gives an overview of how national policy is helping to drive forward changes within the management of diabetes and diabetes related foot ulceration and problems.
Maureen Benbow MA, BA, RGN, HERC, is a Senior Lecturer, University of Chester.
Article accepted for publication: July 2005
November 2005 : Volume 19, Issue 11
What goes around comes around
Sylvie Hampton reviews three ancient dressings that have experienced a revival.
Sylvie Hampton is a Tissue Viability Consultant in Eastbourne.
Article accepted for publication: August 2005
October 2005 : Volume 19, Issue 10
Conservative sharp debridement
Lynfa Edwards discusses the implications of conservative sharp debridement of wounds in the community setting and gives an example of a case scenario in which sharp debridement was undertaken.
Lynfa M. Edwards MSc, RGN, NDN, Cert Ed is Lead Tissue Viability Nurse Specialist with Ealing Primary Care Trust, London. Article accepted for publication: August 2005
September 2005 : Volume 19, Issue 9
Leg clubs: personal reflections on implementing change
Ellie Lindsay discusses the need for community nurses to address the research-practice gap and incorporate evidence based findings into their daily work.
Ellie Lindsay BSc (Hons), RN, DN, CPT, Dip HE is a Independent Specialist Practitioner and Associate Lecturer CRICP, Thames Valley University, London; Ellie also is a Visiting Fellow, Queensland University of Technology, Australia. Article accepted for publication: June 2005
Leg Club® the wording and logo are protected by Registered Trade Mark in the UK and Australia. If you require further information about the Lindsay Leg Club model, please visit the website at www.legclub.org or email Ellie Lindsay at ellie@legclub.org.
August 2005 : Volume 19, Issue 8
Death by pressure ulcer: being held to account when ulcers develop
Sylvie Hampton gives an overview of pressure ulceration and discusses how community nurses may be held to account when pressure ulcers develop.
Sylvie Hampton, MA BSc (Hons) DpSN RGN is a Tissue Viability Consultant, Eastbourne. Article accepted for publication: April 2005
July 2005 : Volume 19, Issue 7
Case study: caring for a patient with a highly exudating leg ulcer
Juli Kirby presents a case study which focuses on the wound management of a patient with a highly exudating leg ulcer.
Juli Kirby RN, EN, Dip N, DN, is a District Nurse and Wound Link Nurse, Carmarthenshire, Wales. Article accepted for publication: January 2005
June 2005 : Volume 19, Issue 6
Short stretch bandaging and the immobile patient
Sylvie Hampton discusses the evidence base for the use of short stretch bandaging on immobile patients.
Sylvie Hampton, MA BSc (Hons) DpSN RGN is a Tissue Viability Consultant, Eastbourne
Article accepted for publication: April 2005
June 2005 : Volume 19, Issue 6
Using applied wound management
Using applied wound management as an assessment tool Simon Barrett describes how district nurses could enhance their practice. Simon Barrett RGN, BSc Nursing is a Tissue Viability Nurse Specialist for East Yorkshire PCT. Article accepted for publication: February 2005
May 2005 : Volume 19, Issue 5
Caring for sloughy wounds
Sylvie Hampton explores the definition of slough and the biofilms of bacteria that inhabit it and will review methods of successfully debriding a wound of necrotic tissue and slough.
Sylvie Hampton MA BSc (Hons) DpSN RGN. Article accepted for publication: March 2005
April 2005 : Volume 19, Issue 4
Vacuum therapy and its potential for wound healing in the community setting
Sylvie Hampton reviews VAC therapy and discusses the potential for its use within the community setting providing evidence in the form of case studies.
Sylvie Hampton MA, BSc (Hons), DpSN, RGN. Tissue Viability Consultant, Eastbourne. Article accepted for publication: January 2005
March 2005 : Volume 19, Issue 3
A comparative study of nurses wound knowledge in two areas
Jacky Edwards et al. describe a study to establish the level of wound management knowledge and skill of community practitioners
Jacky Edwards RGN, DPSN, BSc (Hons), PGDE
Amanda Mitchell RGN, DPSN
Ardershir Bayat - SpR Plastic Surgery, Honorary Lecturer, PhD, BSc (Hons), MBBS, MRCS
Ken Dunn BSc, FRCS Plast
Article accepted for publication: January 2005
February 2005 : Volume 19, Issue 2
Health care assistants: their role in pressure ulcer prevention
In the first of a series of articles, Sylvie Hampton discusses the role of HCA's in the management of pressure ulcer prevention
Sylvie Hampton MA, BSc (Hons), DpSN, RGN is a Tissue Viability Consultant, Eastbourne.
Article accepted for publication: November 2004
January 2005 : Volume 19, Issue 1
The use of tap water for wound cleansing
Sylvie Hampton examines the evidence for wound cleansing with tap water and makes some suggestions for practice
Sylvie Hampton MA, BSc (Hons), DpSN, RGN is a Tissue Viability Consultant in Eastbourne.
Article accepted for publication: August 2004
December 2004 : Volume 18, Issue 12
Managing symptoms of fungating wounds
Sylvie Hampton reviews the most common symptoms associated with fungating wounds and makes suggestions on how these can be managed in order to increase quality of life for the patient with a fungating wound. Sylvie Hampton MA, BSc (Hons), DpSN, RGN is a, Tissue Viability Consultant, Eastbourne. Article accepted for publication: September 2004
October 2004 : Volume 18, Issue 10
Use of Leptospermum honey in chronic wound management
Val Robson reports on two case studies which used a standardised medical honey (Medihoney®) in the treatment of chronic wounds.
September 2004 : Volume 18, Issue 9
Applied wound management
Fiona Meehan, BSc (Hons), RGN, RSCN, is Editor of the Journal of Community Nursing
August 2004 : Volume 18, Issue 8
Holistic wound care
Sylvie Hampton discusses the need for nurses to have an understanding of the process of wound healing and have undertaken a full holistic patient assessment before focusing on the patient's wound. Sylvie Hampton Sylvie Hampton. MA BSc (Hons) DpSN RGN is a Tissue Viability Consultant in Eastbourne. Article accepted for publication: June 2004
August 2004 : Volume 18, Issue 8
Audit of wound management practice
Lynne Watret and Duncan McFarlane describe a recent audit into wound management practice in a primary care division.Lynne Watret is CNS Tissue Viability and Duncan MacFarlane, AHP Clinical Audit Facilitator at Primary Care Division, NHS Greater Glasgow. Article accepted for publication: November 2003
July 2004 : Volume 18, Issue 7
Short stretch bandaging - the way forward for venous leg ulcer management?
Kerry Ellis gives an overview of how community nurses might make use of short stretch bandaging in venous leg ulcer management
Kerry Ellis RGN is a Community Staff Nurse, Huddersfield Central. Article accepted for publication: December 2003
May 2004 : Volume 18, Issue 5
Development of a vascular assessment unit
Robin Cooper describes the development of a vascular assessment unit and the use of telemedicine at a primary care diagnostic and treatment centre
Robin Cooper RGN, Dip DN, CPT is a Wound Care Specialist, North Hampshire PCT.
Article accepted for publication: October 2003
April 2004 : Volume 18, Issue 4
Mixing dressings - a clinical governance issue?
Maureen Benbow discusses the need for better wound management education and knowledge if we are to prevent the inappropriate use of dressings and enhance patient comfort and save time and NHS funds
Maureen Benbow MSc, BA, RGN, HERC, Tissue Viability Nurse. Mid Cheshire Hospital Trust, Crewe, Cheshire. Article accepted for publication: November 2003
March 2004 : Volume 18, Issue 3
Dressing selection and associated pain
Sylvie Hampton discusses the need for enhanced training for district nurses working in the field of wound management
Sylvie Hampton MA, BSc (Hons), DpSN, RGN is a Tissue Viability Consultant, Eastbourne.
Article accepted for publication: November 2003
January 2004 : Volume 18, Issue 1
Vascular wounds - assessment and diagnosis
Maureen Benbow advocates a multi-disciplinary approach to the management and treatment of vascular wounds.
Maureen Benbow, MSc, BA, HERC, RGN, is a Tissue Viability Nurse, Mid-Cheshire Hospital Trust, Crewe, Cheshire. Article accepted for publication: September 2003
December 2003 : Volume 17, Issue 12
Methods of debridement and patient focused care
Mark O'Brien describes several methods of wound debridement and discusses the clinical considerations which must be taken into account before wound debridement is undertaken.
Mark O'Brien RGN, CNS Tissue Viability, Great Ormond Street Hospital, London.
Article accepted for publication: September 2003
November 2003 : Volume 17, Issue 11
Compromised wound healing: managing an infected hip lesion
Ayesha Clarkson describes a case study which discusses the treatment and management of a chronic wound.
This article has been commissioned for publication by Johnson & Johnson Medical Ltd
October 2003 : Volume 17, Issue 10
Implementing change – the mini nutritional assessment tool to enhance leg ulcer healing
Susan Gerry and Lynfa Edwards describe the use of a mini nutritional assessment tool in the management of leg ulcers.
Susan Gerry RGN, NP, DN Cert, CertEd (Adult), ENB 870: Dip in Professional Studies, Dip in Palliative Care is a District Nursing Sister with Bristol North Primary Care Trust.
Lynfa Edwards MSc, RGN, NDN, CertEd is a Tissue Viability Nurse Specialist, Ealing Primary Care Trust. Article accepted for publication: April 2003

MNA form (pp.30) reproduced with kind permission of Nestlé Nutrition Services
October 2003 : Volume 17, Issue 10
Equipment choices - using practice guidelines
Abi Eaves and Liz Scanlon examine the role and responsibility of the district nurse in assessing for and providing equipment in the community setting.
Abi Eaves RGN, BSc (Hons), Dip DN, MSc is a Locality Lead Nurse, Leeds North East Primary Care Trust. Liz Scanlon RGN, Cert DN, MSc is a Nurse Consultant - Tissue Viability, Leeds North West Primary Care Trust. Article accepted for publication: June 2003
September 2003 : Volume 17, Issue 9
Mepilex Border - a product comparison
Jacky Edwards reviews the literature surrounding the use and efficacy of Mepilex Border.Jacky Edwards BSc (Hons), PGDE, DSPN, RGN, ENB 264, 998, 870, N49 is a Clinical Nurse Specialist, South Manchester University Hospitals Trust, Manchester.
Article accepted for publication: June 2003. This article has been commissioned for publication by Mšlnlycke Health Care Ltd.
September 2003 : Volume 17, Issue 9
Critical factors of pressure ulcer development
Suzanne Clark discusses the scientific theory behind pressure ulcer formation. Suzanne Clark, RGN/DipN, is a Staff Nurse, Bromsgrove, Worcestershire. Article accepted for publication: August 2002
June 2003 : Volume 17, Issue 6
Reviewing foam dressings
Jacky Edwards reviews the properties of Curafoam, Curafoam Island and Curafoam Plus. Jacky Edwards, BSc (Hons), RGN, PGDE, DSPN, ENB 264; 998; 870; N49 is a Clinical Nurse Specialist, South Manchester University Hospitals Trust. Article accepted for publication: April 2003
June 2003 : Volume 17, Issue 6
Practical advice for the effective application of compression bandaging
Lynfa Edwards addresses some of the practicalities of compression bandaging.Lynfa M. Edwards MSc, RGN, NDN, Cert Ed. is a Tissue Viability Nurse Specialist, Ealing Primary Care Trust, London. Article accepted for publication: March 2003
May 2003 : Volume 17, Issue 5
Reducing malodour in wounds: a dressing evaluation
Sylvie Hampton describes a pilot evaluation of a carbon dressing.
Sylvie Hampton MA, BSc (Hons), DpSN, RGN is a Tissue Viability Consultant, Eastbourne.
Article accepted for publication: September 2002
April 2003 : Volume 17, Issue 4
Acticoat & Acticoat 7 - a product review
Jacky Edwards reviews two dressings from Smith & Nephew Ltd.
Jacky Edwards BSc (Hons), RGN, PGDE, DSPN, ENB 264, 998, 870, N49 is a Clinical Nurse Specialist, South Manchester University Hospitals Trust.
Article accepted for publication: December 2002
March 2003 : Volume 17, Issue 3
Wounds meet the Web
Adele Atkinson gives an overview of a flexible approach to nurse education.
Adele Atkinson BA (Hons), RGN, RNT, OND, ENB 264 is a Senior Lecturer, Kingston University, London. Article accepted for publication: December 2002
March 2003 : Volume 17, Issue 3
Social isolation and the management of leg ulceration
Annemarie Brown discusses why some patients do not appear to desire complete healing of leg ulceration.
This article was written in part fulfilment of an MSc in Tissue Viability, University of Hertfordshire
Annemarie Brown BSc (Hons), RGN is a Tissue Viability Clinical Nurse Specialist, Southend PCT & Castlepoint & Rochford PCT. Article accepted for publication: July 2002
February 2003 : Volume 17, Issue 2
The silver solution
Suzanne Clarke discusses the use of silver in modern wound management programmes.
Suzanne Clarke RGN, Dip Nursing is a Community Nurse with Dudley Priority NHS Community Trust, Midlands.
Article accepted for publication July 2002.
January 2003 : Volume 17, Issue 1
The use of Promogran in wound healing
Jacky Edwards discusses the latest findings on the healing properties of Promogran.
Jacky Edwards BSc (Hons), RGN, PGDE, DSPN, ENB 264, 998, 870, N49 is a Clinical Nurse Specialist, South Manchester University Hospitals Trust.
Article accepted for publication October 2002.
January 2003 : Volume 17, Issue 1
Body image considerations in patients with wounds
Adele Atkinson explains the psychological issues of scarring and offers pointers as to how nurses might be able to help patients who are affected.
Adele Atkinson BA(Hons), RGN, RNT, OND, ENB264, Senior Lecturer, Kingston University, London. Article accepted for publication August 2002.
October 2002 : Volume 16, Issue 10
Measuring wounds
Rosie Pudner discusses the different techniques of measuring and mapping wounds. Each method is critically evaluated in relation to reliability and validity, and in their application in clinical practice.
This literature review was undertaken as an assignment for the award of PostGraduate Diploma/MSc in Wound Healing and Tissue Repair, University of Wales College of Medicine.
Rosie Pudner BA (Hons), RGN, RCNT, DipN.Ed., RNT is a Senior Lecturer in Tissue Viability, Faculty of Health & Social Care Sciences, Kingston University, London. Article accepted for publication May 2002.
September 2002 : Volume 16, Issue 9
Cigarette smoking and its effect on wound healing
Rosie Pudner discusses the impact of smoking on healing.
NB: This literature review was undertaken as an assignment for the award of PostGraduate Diploma/MSc in Wound Healing and Tissue Repair, University of Wales College of Medicine.
August 2002 : Volume 16, Issue 8
Legal issues for the prevention of pressure ulcers
Louise McKeeney discusses the importance of using approved clinical guidelines to reduce the number of litigation cases associated with pressure ulceration.
Louise McKeeney, RGN, DNCert, DPSN, CHS, Clinical Nurse Specialist Tissue Viability Coventry Primary Care NHS Trust. Article accepted for publication March 2002.
July 2002 : Volume 16, Issue 7
A ten-point assessment plan for wound management
Mark Collier describes how to assess wounds more accurately.
Mark Collier, B.A (Hons), RNT, RCNT, ONC, RN is a Lead Nurse Ð Tissue Viability, United Lincolnshire Hospitals NHS Trust and United Lincolnshire Hospitals Tissue Viability Collaboration (ULHTVC).
Article accepted for publication May 2001.
June 2002 : Volume 16, Issue 6
The management of pretibial lacerations in the community
Corinne Ball discusses the treatment of pretibial lacerations in the community.
Corinne Ball RGN, is a Practice Nurse, Rustington, West Sussex.
Article accepted for publication March 2002.
June 2002 : Volume 16, Issue 6
Telfa Clear
Jacky Edwards continues her series of wound product focus with a discussion on the use of Telfa Clear.
Jacky Edwards BSc (Hons), PGDE, DSPN, RGN, is a clinical nurse specialist, South Manchester University Hospitals Trust.
Article accepted for publication February 2002.
May 2002 : Volume 16, Issue 5
Urgotul - Product Focus
Jacky Edwards reviews the use of Urgotul in burn wound management.
Jacky Edwards BSc (Hons), PGDE, DSPN, RGN, is a clinical nurse specialist Ð wound management, South Manchester University Hospitals Trust.
Article accepted for publication March 2002.
April 2002 : Volume 16, Issue 4
Limited resources in wound management: a reality for some
Mark Collier reflects on a foreign visit in which he experienced first hand the true realities of limited resources in wound management.
Mark Collier, B.A (Hons), RNT, RCNT, ONC, RN is Lead Nurse - Tissue Viability, United Lincolnshire Hospitals NHS Trust, United Lincolnshire Hospitals Tissue Viability Collaboration (ULHTVC), c/o Pilgrim Hospital, Sibsey Road, Boston, Lincolnshire.
Article accepted for publication February 2001.
March 2002 : Volume 16, Issue 3
Product Focus - Flamazine
In a new series focusing on wound management products, Jacky Edwards describes the potential use of Flamazine one per cent cream.
Jacky Edwards BSc (Hons), PGDE, DSPN, RGN, is a clinical nurse specialist, South Manchester University Hospitals Trust.
Article accepted for publication January 2002.
February 2002 : Volume 16, Issue 2
Ancient remedies for modern wounds
Suzanne Clark discusses the use of Aloe vera in modern wound management.
Suzanne Clark RGN, Dip Nursing is a Community Nurse, Dudley Priority NHS Community Trust, Midlands.
Article accepted for publication February 2001.
January 2002 : Volume 16, Issue 1
Vapour-permeable film dressings in wound management
In her ninth article, Rosie Pudner discusses the uses of vapour-permeable film dressings in modern wound management.
Rosie Pudner BA (Hons), RGN, RCNT, Dip.N.Ed., Dip.App.S.S. (Open) is a Senior Lecturer, Kingston University and St GeorgeÕs Medical School, Faculty of Health and Social Care Sciences, London.
Article accepted for publication
September 2001.
December 2001 : Volume 15, Issue 12
Barriers to healing
Lynne Watret and Margaret Armitage discuss the need to prepare the wound bed in order for effective wound healing to take place.
November 2001 : Volume 15, Issue 11
Foam, hydrocellular and hydropolymer dressings in wound management
Rosie Pudner discusses the use of foam, hydrocellular and hydropolymer dressings in every day clinical practice.
November 2001 : Volume 15, Issue 11
Deodorising dressing products in wound management
In this article Rosie Pudner discusses the properties and use of deodorising dressings in wound management.
October 2001 : Volume 15, Issue 10
Management of minor burns
Lindsey McKirdy discusses the modern management of minor burns.
October 2001 : Volume 15, Issue 10
Post-operative dressings in wound management
In her sixth article, Rosie Pudner describes the use of several post-operative dressings used in wound management.
September 2001 : Volume 15, Issue 9
Low/non-adherent dressings in wound management
Rosie Pudner examines the properties of low and non-adherent dressings in wound management.
August 2001 : Volume 15, Issue 8
Growth factors – the healing messengers
Jacky Edwards unravels some of the mysteries of growth factors used in wound healing.
July 2001 : Volume 15, Issue 7
Iodine impregnated dressings
In her fourth article, Rosie Pudner discusses the use of iodine in wound care.
July 2001 : Volume 15, Issue 7
Amorphous hydrogel dressings in wound management
In her third article Rosie Pudner looks at the use of hydrogel dressings on a variety of wound types.
June 2001 : Volume 15, Issue 6
Alginate and hydrofibre dressings in wound management
In her second article, Rosie Pudner, reviews the role of alginate and hydrofibre dressings in modern wound management.
May 2001 : Volume 15, Issue 5
Burn wound cleansing
Lindsey McKirdy discusses the pro's and cons of wound cleansing in burn wound management.
May 2001 : Volume 15, Issue 5
Hydrocolloid dressings in wound management
As a part of a new series looking at wound dressings, rosie Pudner discusses the advantages and use of hydrocolloids.
April 2001 : Volume 15, Issue 4
Starting up a leg ulcer assessment clinic
Queens Nursing Institute (Scotland) Innovation Award Winner Rosy Almond describes how winning the award has allowed her to provide a quality service for practice populations in wick, Scotland
April 2001 : Volume 15, Issue 4
Wound infection unravelled
Mick Miller describes how the treatment of wound infection is a concept that is still not fully understood.
March 2001 : Volume 15, Issue 3
Community assessment of diabetic foot ulcers
Dawn Brookes describes community assessment of diabetic foot lesions
February 2001 : Volume 15, Issue 2
The use of vacuum assisted closure in wound care
Bev Swift describes the use of VAC therapy and discusses the value of negative pressure vacuum sealing techniques.
January 2001 : Volume 15, Issue 1
SpotLight
December 2000 : Volume 14, Issue 12
Management of pre-tibial lacerations
Lindsey McKirdy discusses the healing factors behind this type of wound.
November 2000 : Volume 14, Issue 11
Critical analysis of leg ulcer management
Winifred Farrell discusses a framework for analysing health care needs and how these influence and impact on the delivery of leg ulcer care
October 2000 : Volume 14, Issue 10
Short stretch compression bandaging
Latha Krishnamoorthy and John Melhuish describe the use of short stretch bandaging techniques in the treatment of venouse leg ulcers

Dr Latha Krishnamoorthy FRCS (Edin.) is a Clinical Research Fellow and John M. Melhuish BSc is a Research Scientist at the Wound Healing Research Unit, University College of Wales, Cardiff.
September 2000 : Volume 14, Issue 9
Non-sharp debridement of devitalised wound tissue
Jacky Edwards looks a non-sharp methods of wound debridement and attempts to identify the disadvantages of each method.
August 2000 : Volume 14, Issue 8
Identifying pain associated with leg ulceration
Addah Mangwendeza discusses the need for leg ulcer patients to be thoroughly assessed for pain when receiving wound management care.
July 2000 : Volume 14, Issue 7
Is aseptic technique always necessary?
Diane Gilmour questions whether an aseptic technique is always necessary?
April 2000 : Volume 14, Issue 4
Managing malodorous wounds
Jacky Edwards gives an overview of the management of foul smelling, discharging wounds.
April 2000 : Volume 14, Issue 4
The pharmacological treatment of venous leg ulcers
Jane Renton discusses the use of pharmacological agents to improve healing rates of venous leg ulcers.
February 2000 : Volume 14, Issue 2
Sharp debridement of wounds
Jacky Edwards guides us through the mechanism of debridement.
January 2000 : Volume 14, Issue 1
Pilonidal sinus wounds: the clinical approach
Dr. Dibyesh Bannerjee discusses the causation of pilonidal sinus and modern treatments for this painful condition.
December 1999 : Volume 13, Issue 12
Pressure sore classification grading systems
Lynfa Edwards and Val Banks compare and contrast a variety of published pressure sore classification grading systems for use in the community.
October 1999 : Volume 13, Issue 10
Using negative pressure technology in the management of wounds
Yvonne Franks overviews the benefits of using VAC therapy in wound management and discusses the nursing issues around its use in practice.
September 1999 : Volume 13, Issue 9
Promoting good foot care in type 2 diabetes
Vivien Ogden describes the need for collaboration between community nurses, doctors and chiropodists in order to offer optimum foot care to elderly patients with type 2 diabetes.
August 1999 : Volume 13, Issue 8
Redefining aseptic technique
Diane Gilmour gives an overview of the principles of aseptic technique.
July 1999 : Volume 13, Issue 7
Management of wound exudate
Alexandra Nielsen examines the literature surrounding the role and management of exudate from chronic wounds.
June 1999 : Volume 13, Issue 6
Managing split skin grafts and donor sites in the community
Adele Atkinson discusses the different types of skin grafts seen in the community setting, healing rates and the use of dressings for both skin grafts and donor sites.
May 1999 : Volume 13, Issue 5
Low level LASER therapy
Yvonne Franks discusses the use of low level LASER therapy in the management of chronic wounds.
April 1999 : Volume 13, Issue 4
The management of patients with a surgical wound
Rosemary Pudner discusses the impact that changes in the delivery of wound care have had on nurses working in the community.
March 1999 : Volume 13, Issue 3
Larval therapy in a diabetic foot
Christa Waller and Maggie Walker describe a case study whereby larval therapy was implemented in an attempt to avoid amputation of an infected diabetic foot.
February 1999 : Volume 13, Issue 2
The complexities of wound management in the diabetic foot
Lynfa Edwards and Alethea Foster discuss the complexities of wound management in the diabetic foot and give a joint community nursing podiatric perspective on multidisciplinary care.
February 1999 : Volume 13, Issue 2
Bandaging a literature review
Jacky Edwards gives a literature review on types of bandages and bandaging technique.
January 1999 : Volume 13, Issue 1
Prevention and management of pressure sores Part One
Gillian Pedley reviews the causes of pressure sores, assessment of risk and their prevention.
November 1998 : Volume 12, Issue 11
Plastic surgery: a community perspective
Jacky Edwards discusses some of the aftercare problems faced by community nurses caring for plastic surgery wounds and donor sites.
October 1998 : Volume 12, Issue 10
The management of diabetic foot ulcers
Rosemary Pudner describes the special care needed when dealing with diabetic patients with foot ulceration.
July 1998 : Volume 12, Issue 7
Effective wound health care
Elizabeth Scanlon & Peter McGinnis describe the trial of a venous ulcer bandage system.
June 1998 : Volume 12, Issue 6
Educating nurses to care for patients with leg ulcers
Louise Brereton, Pauline Barber & Brenda King discuss the adequacy of educational provision for nurses involved in managing patients with leg ulcers.
April 1998 : Volume 12, Issue 4
Managing cavity wounds
Rosemary Pudner discusses the management of patients with a cavity wound.
March 1998 : Volume 12, Issue 3
Treating Minor Burns
January 1998 : Volume 12, Issue 1
Woundcare: Advances In Wound Management
January 1998 : Volume 12, Issue 1