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New Wound Care Today journal launched and available online

New Wound Care Today journal launched and available online

Click HERE to see your copy.

 

Unlike many of the journals currently available, Wound Care Today’s content is steered not by the needs of publishers, but by a strong editorial board comprising members of influential wound care charity the Wound Care Alliance. As such, Wound Care Today offers a unique perspective on tissue viability, steered by other nurses and clinicians rather than editors or industry.

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ACA Conference and Exhibition (8 - 9 May 2014)

ACA Conference and Exhibition (8 - 9 May 2014)

The Association for Continence Advice Annual Conference and Exhibition 2014 will be held at the Hilton Birmingham Metropole on the 8th and 9th May 2014, and is the ideal opportunity to meet like minded professionals whilst continuing professional development.

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ACA Harm Free Care Seminar

ACA Harm Free Care Seminar

The Association for Continence Advice (ACA) is hosting a Harm Free Care Seminar in Birmingham on 8th or 9th May, aimed at care staff working in long term care settings who look after clients with varying bladder and bowel problems. This conference will appeal to registered nurses and care home assistants. 

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Latest Issue

‘Patients are the centre of everything you do’

‘Patients are the centre of everything you do’

In the latest in JCN’s series profiling the decision-makers in UK nursing, Jason Beckford-Ball spoke to Jane Cummings, England’s chief nursing officer, about patient-centred care and moving from acute to community services. 

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What nurses need to know about the application of larval therapy

What nurses need to know about the application of larval therapy

In chronic wound management the potential for healing increases following effective debridement. Indeed, it has been suggested that debridement’s effect on chronic wound healing is similar in impact to the relief of pressure in preventing pressure ulceration. Debridement can be performed using a number of methods, but larval debridement has recognised benefits, including the breakdown of necrotic tissue; removal of microbes; wound cleansing; and breakdown of biofilm. The reduction of malodour in the wound can also help increase patients’ self-esteem and overall wellbeing. This article looks at the use of larval therapy in a community setting, which can be particularly cost-effective as rapid debridement swiftly reduces the bacterial load, helping to lessen the potential for hospital admission.

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Thinking of writing for JCN?

If you are thinking of writing an article for publication in the Journal of Community Nursing, click here to download a copy of our Guidelines for Authors document. This contains all the information you will need to make your submission.