Journal of Community Nursing - page 97

JCN
2013,Vol 27, No 4
97
MENTAL HEALTH
and the development of an eating
disorder (Killen et al, 1994). However,
prevention programmes generally
target anorexia nervosa and bulimia
nervosa rather than weight and shape
preoccupation.
This study demonstrates the
potential use of self-identified weight
and shape preoccupation as an
approach to early intervention for
individuals at risk of developing an
eating disorder. The study found that
simply asking students whether they
are weight-preoccupied could be an
initial step in early intervention for
those suspected of being at-risk of
developing an eating disorder.
JCN
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KEY POINTS
Obsession with weight has been
identified as a significant problem
in modern society, particularly
among young women.
The phenomena of weight
and shape preoccupation have
been recognised as preliminary
behaviours to the development
of eating disorders.
This study aimed to identify
the current incidence of,
and factors associated with,
weight preoccupation, shape
preoccupation, and eating disorder
risk in female US university
students aged 18 to 23 years.
Overall, the study found that
asking students whether they are
weight-preoccupied could be an
initial step in early intervention
for those at risk of developing an
eating disorder.
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