Journal of Community Nursing - page 77

JCN
2013,Vol 27, No 4
77
STOMA CARE
Therefore, there is an argument
that any expense incurred by the
use of products such as Appeel
is mitigated by the subsequent
reduction in peristomal skin
complications and the reduced
use of nurse specialist or GP time
further along the care pathway. The
same can be said for the extra cost of
equipment or dressings incurred by
repairing peristomal skin damage that
could have been avoided by the use of
products such as Appeel.
CONCLUSION
The creation of a stoma can have an
extremely deleterious effect on the
patient’s quality of life, self-esteem
and body image. At the same time,
the repeated procedure of removing
and applying the stoma pouch leaves
the surrounding skin vulnerable, both
to damage from effluent leakage and
skin stripping due to adhesive fixers.
Silicone-based adhesive removers
are an essential tool for community
nurses working with people who
live with a stoma, not only reducing
the pain caused by regular pouch
removal, but also improving their
quality of life and wellbeing.
Appeel is invaluable to this
patient group as it effectively
removes adhesive, thereby helping
to prevent peristomal skin damage
(Stephen-Haynes, 2008). This not
only preserves skin integrity, but also
potentially saves resources that may
have been spent on subsequent
skin breakdown.
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JCN
KEY POINTS
The repeated procedure
of removing and applying
the stoma pouch leaves the
surrounding skin vulnerable,
both to damage from effluent
leakage and skin stripping due to
adhesive fixers.
Stomal complications are
common and will often occur in
the time soon after the stoma has
been fitted.
Using a silicone-based adhesive
remover can help to avoid the
effects of skin stripping and
maintain the barrier function of
the peristomal skin.
Appeel is invaluable to this
patient group as it effectively
removes adhesive, thereby
helping to prevent peristomal
skin damage.
Silicone-based adhesive removers
are an essential tool for nurses
working with people who live
with a stoma, not only reducing
the pain, but also improving their
quality of life and wellbeing.
The creation of a stoma can have
an extremely deleterious effect
on the patient’s quality of life,
self-esteem and body image.
As stomas essentially involve
maintaining a permanently
open breach of the skin, the site
requires expert skin care.
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