Journal of Community Nursing - page 42

42 JCN
2013,Vol 27, No 4
WOUND CARE
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KEY POINTS
Pain can often result in non-
concordance, therefore, clinicians
need to ensure that patients
undergoing dressing changes
have their pain minimised.
Patients should not have to face
the trauma of repeated painful
dressing changes.
Clinicians need to reduce wound
pain as much as possible through
the appropriate use of wound
care products, analgesia and
distraction techniques.
Pain education helps to dispel
common misconceptions and
myths that might obstruct
effective pain management.
Analgesia must be given at
least 30–60 minutes before
dressing change.
Dose and type should relate
to the severity, frequency and
duration of pain, and background
pain must also be taken
into account.
Educating patients by explaining
the procedure and how it will be
performed can reduce anxiety
and fear.
Dressings should be changed
before they become saturated
and start leaking potentially
corrosive wound exudate onto
the periwound skin.
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